Wednesday, 6 January 2016

General Conveyor Inc.
Pallet Dispenser-Model RA20
 
The RA20 is capable of handling various pallet sizes and types with minimal change-over time, and can be retrofitted into existing palletizer and conveyor lines. The heavy-duty motorized lift design with pneumatically operated dispensing mechanisms enable it to dispense the bottom pallet onto a conveyor, or add a new pallet to the bottom of the stack.
- Right-angle or in-line configuration.
- Very quiet operation.
- Competitively priced.
- Options: programmable control; pre-wiring & piping package, Quick change adjustment with jackscrew and hand wheel tooling. Rotating Hook Fingers Rotating Fingers Bottom Plate Fingers

FEATURES
- Up to 20 pallet or 1500 lb capacity.
- Up to 180 pallets per hour.
- Adjustable for pallet sizes from 31” x 31” up to 53” x 48”.
- RA20S model is available with greater capacities.
- Discharge elevation 10” to 26”, adjustable in field (optional floor discharge unit available).
- Suitable for a dry, indoor industrial operating environment with temperatures between 40°F and 104°F (5°C to 40°C).
- Not recommended for wet or damp locations.
- Painted mild steel.


Some guards or components may have been temporarily removed for illustrative purposes only. All equipment guards, protective devices and safety components shall be in place correctly before operating the machine.

Monday, 17 August 2015

Pharmaceutical Conveyor

Pharmaceutical Conveyoritem4
  • Sanitop tabletop conveyors.
  • Full wash-down capability.
  • Stainless steel construction.
  • Closed top frame.
  • Elevated chain provides access for cleaning.
  • Self-cleaning serpentine design return wear strips.
  • All welds are continuous, smooth, clean and polished.
  • Flush fitting side transfers without deadplates.
  • Pocketless design with sloping surfaces for any cross bars.
  • Drives can be underslung, side, or overhead mounted.
  • Serpentine or bi-directional accumulation tables of equivalent design available.item5
  • Pharmaceutical Conveyor

General Conveyor sanitop conveyors are designed for the uncompromising and specific sanitary demands of the pharmaceutical products industry. Designed for easy cleaning, we offer rugged, heavy-duty construction for years of trouble-free service.

Tabletop Conveyor

C-Channel Tabletop Conveyoritem2


  • Mild steel painted or stainless steel construction.
  • Washdown construction available.
  • Fixed or adjustable guide rails.
  • Appliation specific head and tail transfers.
  • Standard or custom design.
  • Quick turnaround.
  • Modular construction.
For over 60 years, General Conveyor has provided premier quality tabletop chain conveyor. Our applications specialists will select the right combination of chain, wearstrip and guide rails to suit your specific application. Strong leg frames, solid side frames, and durable components combined with attention to detail during the manufacturing process, provide for quiet, smooth running, long lasting conveyors.

HOW TO USE CONVEYORS TO IMPROVE PLANT ERGONOMICS

HOW TO USE CONVEYORS
TO IMPROVE PLANT ERGONOMICS




ErgonomicsAccording to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the leading causes of workplace injuries and illnesses. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, in fact, shows MSDs (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, muscle strains, lower back injuries, etc.) accounted for roughly 33% of all worker injury and illness cases reported in 2013.


Conveyors can reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injury in tasks that involve manual handling by reducing the need for repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads. But the devil is in the details, as always. If your conveyor workstations aren’t correctly configured, they can actually contribute to the development of MSDs. Conveyor systems are essentially an interface with workers, and should be designed as such.


What can you do to ensure you aren’t creating an ergonomic issue with your conveyor systems?

When setting up conveyor workstations, factoring in ergonomic considerations isn’t just a good idea – it’s critical. Aside from helping you avoid long-term injuries and potential worker’s compensation problems, good conveyor/human interface design causes higher productivity and helps reduce errors since workers are fresher and less tired as they pick, pack, or assemble.

Here’s a look at a few ergonomic solutions that can help keep workers from risking injury by bending, stretching, or reaching:


1. Proper Design

When designing a conveyor workstation, you should make sure that it delivers the load directly into an ergonomically ideal work position for loading, processing, or other activities. When the item arrives, workers should not have to re-position it for loading to a pallet, into a container, etc.

Utilize ball transfers or turntable tables to allow easy product rotation, or integrated scissor lifts to allow height-base positioning for work. Look at the workstation and find places where people have to bend or stretch. Do what you can to eliminate those postures. Other solutions might include balancers or positioners at critical work process points.

Areas of concern when you design points for workers and conveyors to interface are:

Work surface height: The distance from the floor to the top of conveyor rollers or belt surface. This should be set so that the height of the load is at a comfortable working position for an average person.
Reach distance: Make sure the distance from the edge of the conveyor to the load (where a person would have to grasp or manipulate a conveyed load) isn’t so great that bending or stretching is necessary. This also applies to side-reaching distances.
Working height: This is the height at which hands are normally held to do work on conveyed items.
Aside from its ergonomic benefits, conveyor design that embraces this is also safer, since people aren’t bending over running equipment where a chance that loose clothing or hair might be caught.

As noted in an Ergonomics Plus article, “designing a job to allow for good posture, less exertion, fewer motions, and better heights and reaches [allows for] greater efficiency and productivity.”

Also see Cisco-Eagle’s extensive article on conveyor workstation design for more information.


2. Chutes & Spirals

If containers on the conveyor are always moving in one direction, use gravity to your advantage. Deploy chutes or decline belt conveyors deliver goods from the mezzanine (or an overhead conveyor) to floor level at an ideal working height so that workers don’t have to bend or strain to reach them.

Chutes or spirals are preferred because they take advantage of vertical space, freeing up more room for production, operations, and storage on the warehouse floor. Of course, there are other alternatives to chutes—such as incline conveyors—that may suit your needs in some situations.
Approximately 1.2 million back-related injuries are reported each year, according to BLS data, so it’s important to reduce injury potential where possible.


3. Gravity Conveyors

For items lightweight enough to be moved by hand, take advantage of gravity conveyors to avoid having to strain to move items between workstations, out of a truck, or other places where you have frequent activity in a defined area. Gravity conveyors, ideal for transporting materials in warehouses, back rooms, and production lines, work best for short, inclined runs.

In a group of connected work cells, gravity conveyor lines are ideal for moving product between without people lifting it. If the cells are connected—and the volume is such that you don’t need a power system—allowing people to finish their work and roll it to the next station is both ergonomic and economical.

Aside from the ergonomic benefits of moving a load with minimal strain to the worker, gravity conveyors are also low-cost and can help reduce energy needs in the warehouse.


4. Portable/Expandable Conveyors

Portable conveyors like skate-wheel sections on casters or flexible conveyors are also ergonomically-friendly, since they can be positioned at a particular point of work to reduce the amount of manual handling. These conveyors work well in shipping or receiving docks, since their inherent flexibility and maneuverability allows them to be rolled out to work as needs arise, and then stored when needed. Having a flexible or portable conveyor on hand means employees can use it in places where fixed equipment isn’t practical, but where loads must be handled

As noted in MHI’s Application Guidelines for Ergonomic Assist and Safety Equipment, expandable conveyors “provide a mechanized means of moving material to the worker,” resulting in fewer mistakes, less stooping, and less reaching.


5. Floor-Mounted Conveyors

For heavier pallet loads, floor-mounted roller conveyors can prove to be an ideal solution to pass larger materials between workstations. The primary ergonomic benefit of these types of conveyors is they allow workers to easily work around the conveyor without the typical stresses or strains of dealing with heavier loads.

We have implemented systems in heavy industrial applications where loads as large as rooftop air conditioning units (larger than passenger vans) or drilling equipment or large containers and other heavy machinery is conveyed at floor level. These items must be easy to move and handle. The use of conveyor in these situations is not only ergonomic—it’s a direct contributor to a lean manufacturing application.

Since heavy-duty lifting and manipulation of heavy loads often leads to costly compensation claims, floor-mounted conveyors help to both protect workers and reduce costs for companies. Ergonomics Plus notes that ergonomic solutions such as these showcase a company’s “commitment to safety and health as a core value,” resulting in enhanced employee engagement, productivity, and efficiency.


Final Thoughts

Above all else, ergonomic improvements to the warehouse can reduce safety and health risks posed to workers by making the working environment less physically demanding. Solutions such as conveyors can reduce the need for repetitive lifting and carrying while also improving material flow, processes, and labor.

In order to realize the full benefits of conveyors and protect your organization’s most valuable asset – its employees – it’s critical to keep ergonomic considerations in mind at all times.

How is your organization evaluating the work environment for ergonomic factors to drive employee productivity and safety?
Posted by Scott Stone

Tuesday, 4 August 2015

Conveyors= BALANCING LONG-TERM GOALS WITH SHORT-TERM COSTS

BALANCING LONG-TERM GOALS 
WITH SHORT-TERM COSTS


Above: Total Cost of Ownership means that a greater initial investment may save you money over time in maintenance and operational costs.

When you invest in a material handling solution, you’re investing in the future of your business. That makes it important to consider all of the options available to you to get the most use and greatest value for your solution. Your long-term goals should be a driving force for your decisions, as should the total cost of your solution over time.

Long-term goals to consider
When you’ve determined the solution you need for today, that same solution may not be ideal for your changing business needs. To save yourself the extra time, effort, and money of building a new system 5 or 10 years down the line, make sure you’ve asked yourself these questions:
Will my product line change? It’s common for a product line to expand. What is even more common is for a product’s packaging to be changed. In particular, we see this kind of repackaging driven by marketing efforts that is caught too late; the packages won’t convey and then you have a serious, expensive problem.
Will my business grow? If your business expands and you need more throughput or additional conveyor, keep that in mind to make the next step as painless as possible.
What is the total cost of ownership? Like any investment, conveyors have initial costs, operational costs, and maintenance costs. Higher initial costs may be compensated for by lower costs in energy and maintenance over time. When you plan for these long-term costs, you can decrease the total cost of ownership.
How to design for business flexibility
Consider a variable speed conveyor
A variable speed conveyor lets you ramp up the speed during peak seasons. Even better, it will run at lower speeds during non-peak periods, which saves on energy and component wear. If your business has large discrepancies in needed throughput for the year, or if you may need a change in throughput in the future, you will want to look into a variable speed conveyor.
Use decentralized drives when possible
Decentralized drives are installed in modular sections, making them easier to expand for a growing business. They also eliminate excessive downtime during required maintenance since one module can be dropped in for a non-working module. These drives can be installed with pallet handling conveyors and 24-volt conveyors—the 24-volt conveyors have an added bonus of being basically maintenance-free.

Credit to Boyce Bonham


Monday, 1 June 2015

IMPROVE PLANT ERGONOMICS

HOW TO USE CONVEYORS TO IMPROVE PLANT ERGONOMICS



ErgonomicsAccording to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the leading causes of workplace injuries and illnesses. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, in fact, shows MSDs (e.g., carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, muscle strains, lower back injuries, etc.) accounted for roughly 33% of all worker injury and illness cases reported in 2013.



Conveyors can reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injury in tasks that involve manual handling by reducing the need for repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads. But the devil is in the details, as always. If your conveyor workstations aren’t correctly configured, they can actually contribute to the development of MSDs. Conveyor systems are essentially an interface with workers, and should be designed as such.


What can you do to ensure you aren’t creating an ergonomic issue with your conveyor systems?

When setting up conveyor workstations, factoring in ergonomic considerations isn’t just a good idea – it’s critical. Aside from helping you avoid long-term injuries and potential worker’s compensation problems, good conveyor/human interface design causes higher productivity and helps reduce errors since workers are fresher and less tired as they pick, pack, or assemble.

Here’s a look at a few ergonomic solutions that can help keep workers from risking injury by bending, stretching, or reaching:



1. Proper Design

When designing a conveyor workstation, you should make sure that it delivers the load directly into an ergonomically ideal work position for loading, processing, or other activities. When the item arrives, workers should not have to re-position it for loading to a pallet, into a container, etc.

Utilize ball transfers or turntable tables to allow easy product rotation, or integrated scissor lifts to allow height-base positioning for work. Look at the workstation and find places where people have to bend or stretch. Do what you can to eliminate those postures. Other solutions might include balancers or positioners at critical work process points.

Areas of concern when you design points for workers and conveyors to interface are:

Work surface height: The distance from the floor to the top of conveyor rollers or belt surface. This should be set so that the height of the load is at a comfortable working position for an average person.
Reach distance: Make sure the distance from the edge of the conveyor to the load (where a person would have to grasp or manipulate a conveyed load) isn’t so great that bending or stretching is necessary. This also applies to side-reaching distances.
Working height: This is the height at which hands are normally held to do work on conveyed items.
Aside from its ergonomic benefits, conveyor design that embraces this is also safer, since people aren’t bending over running equipment where a chance that loose clothing or hair might be caught.

As noted in an Ergonomics Plus article, “designing a job to allow for good posture, less exertion, fewer motions, and better heights and reaches [allows for] greater efficiency and productivity.”

Also see Cisco-Eagle’s extensive article on conveyor workstation design for more information.



2. Chutes & Spirals

If containers on the conveyor are always moving in one direction, use gravity to your advantage. Deploy chutes or decline belt conveyors deliver goods from the mezzanine (or an overhead conveyor) to floor level at an ideal working height so that workers don’t have to bend or strain to reach them.

Chutes or spirals are preferred because they take advantage of vertical space, freeing up more room for production, operations, and storage on the warehouse floor. Of course, there are other alternatives to chutes—such as incline conveyors—that may suit your needs in some situations.
Approximately 1.2 million back-related injuries are reported each year, according to BLS data, so it’s important to reduce injury potential where possible.



3. Gravity Conveyors

For items lightweight enough to be moved by hand, take advantage of gravity conveyors to avoid having to strain to move items between workstations, out of a truck, or other places where you have frequent activity in a defined area. Gravity conveyors, ideal for transporting materials in warehouses, back rooms, and production lines, work best for short, inclined runs.

In a group of connected work cells, gravity conveyor lines are ideal for moving product between without people lifting it. If the cells are connected—and the volume is such that you don’t need a power system—allowing people to finish their work and roll it to the next station is both ergonomic and economical.

Aside from the ergonomic benefits of moving a load with minimal strain to the worker, gravity conveyors are also low-cost and can help reduce energy needs in the warehouse.

   

4. Portable/Expandable Conveyors

Portable conveyors like skate-wheel sections on casters or flexible conveyors are also ergonomically-friendly, since they can be positioned at a particular point of work to reduce the amount of manual handling. These conveyors work well in shipping or receiving docks, since their inherent flexibility and maneuverability allows them to be rolled out to work as needs arise, and then stored when needed. Having a flexible or portable conveyor on hand means employees can use it in places where fixed equipment isn’t practical, but where loads must be handled

As noted in MHI’s Application Guidelines for Ergonomic Assist and Safety Equipment, expandable conveyors “provide a mechanized means of moving material to the worker,” resulting in fewer mistakes, less stooping, and less reaching.



5. Floor-Mounted Conveyors

For heavier pallet loads, floor-mounted roller conveyors can prove to be an ideal solution to pass larger materials between workstations. The primary ergonomic benefit of these types of conveyors is they allow workers to easily work around the conveyor without the typical stresses or strains of dealing with heavier loads.

We have implemented systems in heavy industrial applications where loads as large as rooftop air conditioning units (larger than passenger vans) or drilling equipment or large containers and other heavy machinery is conveyed at floor level. These items must be easy to move and handle. The use of conveyor in these situations is not only ergonomic—it’s a direct contributor to a lean manufacturing application.

Since heavy-duty lifting and manipulation of heavy loads often leads to costly compensation claims, floor-mounted conveyors help to both protect workers and reduce costs for companies. Ergonomics Plus notes that ergonomic solutions such as these showcase a company’s “commitment to safety and health as a core value,” resulting in enhanced employee engagement, productivity, and efficiency.



Final Thoughts

Above all else, ergonomic improvements to the warehouse can reduce safety and health risks posed to workers by making the working environment less physically demanding. Solutions such as conveyors can reduce the need for repetitive lifting and carrying while also improving material flow, processes, and labor.

In order to realize the full benefits of conveyors and protect your organization’s most valuable asset – its employees – it’s critical to keep ergonomic considerations in mind at all times.

How is your organization evaluating the work environment for ergonomic factors to drive employee productivity and safety?

by Scott Stone